House Training a Puppy

Amy Trumpeter
4 min readSep 14, 2020
House Training a Puppy

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Bringing your new puppy home is a delight for all the family…..that is until you realise how frequently they need to pee or poop! House training a puppy is a challenge, but you will be glad to know that with the right training they will pick it up extremely quickly. There is plenty of information available along with things that can make it easier such as training sprays and puppy pads.

Dogs naturally like to ‘go to the loo’ in the same place or a place that they know is their toilet, such as peeing up a bush or on a patch of grass in the yard. This comes quite naturally to them and they don’t like to soil their own beds. So combining this habit with a bit of positive reinforcement will do the trick.

When and how to start House Training a Puppy

Of course it depends on how old your pup is when you get it, but as a general rule it’s a good idea to start as soon as you get your new puppy home. Decide how and where you will be training, such as using a crate or newspaper. Make sure that you have a place for him or her to ‘go’ which will usually be outside. Our Blake has his peeing patch of grass in the back yard. Then arm yourself with some healthy puppy treats to reward the dog within 5 seconds (if possible) of going to the toilet in the right place.

The Advantages of Using a Crate

A crate has the added advantage of keeping your pup safe and secure. It’s supposed to be a comfortable place for your pup, not a place of punishment so don’t use it in that way. Make sure that the crate is the appropriate size for the breed and that he has plenty of room to stand up and turn around in. Generally, a dog will not poop or pee in his own crate because then he will have to sit in it! You can feed your dog in his crate and also make it a nice cosy place for him or her with blankets and toys. When he is comfortable in his crate then you can regularly take him outside to do his business. If he doesn’t go that’s ok, ignore, but if he does, treat immediately and make a massive fuss!

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Amy Trumpeter

Hi I’m Amy — travel blogger, dog lover, digital marketer. I write mainly about Europe, Middle East and Southeast Asia. Getting into drones!